The Guardian Trauma Kit is a pre-packed MOLLE bag with custom pouches for the most common handy supplies used to treat gunshot wounds. It's lacking in a number of things you'd want in a proper kit (morphine, anaesthetics, sutures, blood volume expanders) because it's made specifically to treat gunshot wounds, specifically on the battlefield. This particular trauma kit is interesting because while it not only supplies gunshot-gradetrauma supplies, it also includes a DVD on how to properly use those supplies. Despite being covered in warnings that it is not dispensing medical advice, we found the medical advice on this DVD really interesting and useful.

We wanted to compare the cost of buying and packing these items on your own to the price for the kit, but the only itemized lists of what's inside seem to come from one particular (very good) review, where the reviewer seems to have added some custom items. So we're just going to use this list, and tell you what everything costs to pack yourself. Items that don't come in the commercial version are pretty cheap to add back in.

Prices for items were supplied by Google Shopping. Prices varied on items, and we used selections that looked like they were not replacement items (for instance, an NPA runs from $2.50 - $10, we used the kit with surgilube included, at the middle of the price range).

This list is blatantly stolen from the 17 Truama Kits Comparison.

This kit includes:
McMillan Tourniquet $16
Truama Shears $3
(additional accessory pouches for both cost $21)

Bleeding Kit:
(sub kit)
  tampons $2/pack
  super glue $1 for ordinary cyanoacrylate, $10 for liquivet (sterile, and less likely to burn)
  safety pins $1/pack
  plastic wrap (seen in a flat pack. Either pack it yourself from a roll or buy a 9'x12' plastic drop cloth for $1)
  scalpel ($6)
  band aids $2/pack
  chem-light $2 each
(2x) priMed compressed Gauze 4.5" x 4.1 yds (NSN: 6510-01-503-2117) $2 each
(3x) Latex-Free Gloves $2/pack
Kerlix Guaze 4.5" x 4.1 yds   $2 each  (NSN: 6510-01-497-1063) (Kerlix 6715)
4" Israeli Emergency Bandage  $6.50 each  (NSN: 6510-01-460-0849) 
Quikclot ACS+ $30 each
ACE Bandage $2 each
Medical Tape (probably NSN: 6510-00-926-8884)(Probably 3M Durapore) $1 each
Duct Tape (2x100 mini roll) $3 for a 2-pack

Airway Kit:
Hemostat (surgical clamp) $3 each
Sharpie Marker $1 each
Laminated Quick Reference Cards (We don't know what cards specifically, but the Skedco First Responder Card Set 6530-01-548-4384 costs $20, and the North American Rescue Tactical Field Care Card 6515-01-537-4163 costs 4.50. The former looks more like what's pictured in the video, and we will use that for the price calculation.)
28fr Nasopharyngeal Airway w/ Sergilube ($5.50)  (airway NSN: 6515-01-501-6090) (Surgilube NSN: 6510-00-111-7829)
(x2) 14ga x 3 1/4 Catheter (Angiocath) $10 - $20 each (NSN: 6515-01-153-5373)
(x2) 4" x 4" sterile gauze pads $1 each
(x2) Asherman Chest Seal $11 each
5" x 9" ABD Pad (NSN: 6510-00-559-6130) $1 each
Petroleum Gauze Burn Pad $1.50
(2x) Spenco Second Skin Pad (we assume the 3x6.5" pads)(kit of 2 for $10)
CPR Face Shield $4 each

The total for the kit contents is $200, if you are assembling only one kit. The major costs come from Quikclot, catheters, and laminated quick reference cards. The actual Guardian Kit on the market runs $240-260, so if you imagine the MOLLE medical pack to cost $60-80 (it does, minus the specialized pouches for trauma shears and tourniquet you get on the real thing), the deal is actually pretty good. The Guardian kit doesn't come with the spares you'd get if you assembled it yourself, but we'd still recommend actually buying it if assembling a pack for one. Still, the easy availability of bulk medical supplies means that you could probably get a pretty good economy of scale going if you were assembling these for a militia, disaster response team, or the like. Of course, we don't mean to endorse The Guardian as the be-all end-all of trauma needs. Notably missing are IV bags, morphine injectors (and in fact, pharmaceuticals of all types), and EKG's, to name just a few things.


HERE ARE SOME PHOTOS